Esther Huibers and Carl Norlin, Neebing

Esther Huibers and Carl Norlin
 
 
"We're hopeful that extreme weather won't impact us. We're going to adapt and make the most of it. We have to. We're forced to adapt." 

 

Esther Huibers and Carl Norlin, Neebing

Esther Huibers and Carl Norlin are the proprietors of Windy Sunshine Farm. They use foraged and wild harvested plants like saskatoons, birch (syrup), chokecherries, and other berries to make jams, preserves, wines and other drinks to sell.

Esther and Carl have noticed many climate-related changes in the region, including severe flooding and extreme storms, new bird species, and earlier budding and blooming of particular plants. In 2012 they experienced serious flooding on a farm property they have since sold. During one storm it rained while the ground was still frozen, causing damage to their gardens. Because of this, and some other issues, Esther and Carl have "decided to move to higher ground."

Esther has noticed that the robins did not leave the area until very late this year. They also noticed that the pussy willows budded out earlier than usual - in the month of February. They say that the fall season is warmer than it was in the past. Esther hopes someday the warming temperatures will allow them to grow more varieties of fruit trees. Carl agrees, "We're hopeful that extreme weather won't impact us. We're going to adapt and make the most of it. We have to. We're forced to adapt."